Bibliolog Courses

A basic Bibliolog course runs over four whole days (approximately 30 working hours) and is offered either as a workshop running over consecutive days or is broken up into several units. By virtue of this training those interested are acquainted with Bibliolog as a method and experience it firsthand. The separate building blocks of a Bibliolog are learnt and practiced, which involves familiarising oneself with  key techniques such as Echoing and Interviewing, but also with the selection of texts, the structure of a Bibliolog and its preparation, including key elements such as the Prolog, the Introduction and the Epilog.

The basic course clarifies and conveys the basic theoretical ideas underpinning Bibliolog as well as relevant background information (such as its founders Peter and Susan Pitzele, related concepts such Midrash and textual hermeneutics, the requirements for and the role of the director, but also of the participating community or group). It further reflects on what unfolds during a Bibliolog.

During the second half of the course all participants present their own, independently prepared Bibliolog and receive feedback both from the group and the trainer or trainers.

The certificate confirms that its recipient has been trained to use the method of Bibliolog in a correct and responsible manner and that he or she is considered able to uphold the necessary respect for the biblical text and for those taking part in a Bibliolog.

 

Enrolment in an advanced Bibliolog course presupposes the successful completion of a basic Bibliolog course. Advanced Bibliolog courses comprise of at least 15 working hours. The training familiarises participants with the methods unique to each of the five specific advanced modules and offers an opportunity to experience these firsthand. Thus, he or she is equipped with the necessary skills for implementation.

A description of the five advanced modules can be found   ->  here

 

 

Advanced Bibliolog Courses

Enrolment in an advanced Bibliolog course presupposes the successful completion of a basic Bibliolog course. Advanced Bibliolog courses comprise of at least 15 working hours. The training familiarises participants with the methods unique to each of the five specific advanced modules and offers an opportunity to experience these firsthand. Thus, he or she is equipped with the necessary skills for implementation.

 

Bibliolog with Non-Narrative Texts

When starting out with offering Bibliologs, narrative texts are often best suited, but in principle a Bibliolog can be prepared around any type of text, that is, with Psalms, genealogies or New Testament letters. Either a certain storyline is created that invites participants to experience the plot from a specific vantage point or non-human roles such as the way or justice will be interviewed. In both cases it is surprising to observe how much for example a certain letter or a person such as Paul comes to life or how the symbolic language of the Psalms speaks to the participants.

How for example does one of the "enemies" in Ps 23 feel, when those who he persecutes have a table been laid out for them? Or what does Paul feel when he dictates: "For I see no reason to be ashamed of the gospel..." (Rm 1:16)

 

Bibliolog with Objects

While the basic form of Bibliolog focuses on the language level an advanced form can focus and thus bring to light relationships, dynamics and certain developments within a text. This can be done through the use of objects, mostly in the form of chairs.  These are used by the director to build and develop biblical scenes or to set up a relationship pattern between certain characters found in the text. Thereby the White Fire is stoked on an additional level. Participants too can be invited to get involved in a hands-on manner, that is, through expressing their perceptions in response to the Bibliolog through staging constellations with the given objects.

How could the relationship between Ruth and Naomi be expressed through two chairs as the two, according to Rt 1:19, "went on until they came to Bethlehem"?

In the scene that speaks about the "true relatives" of Jesus (Mk 3:31-35) - what could possibly unfold after Jesus voices the words, "Anyone who does the will of God, that person is my brother and sister and mother"? How could the chairs be placed to represent his biological family and his followers, and how the chair for Jesus now, if and when the participants are to express closeness, distance and estrangement among the biblical players?

 

Encounter      

The Encounter stages a dialog between two biblical characters. It could take on the form of a conversation explicitly reported in the Bible or one originating in the White Fire of a text and making sense in terms of what is unfolding. Participants are either asked as an individual or as a group to enter into a dialog in a given situation so that a conversation - with an open end - can be developed. Normally, it sets a certain dynamic free and leads people more deeply into what is happening in the text.

What unfolds between Isaac and Ishmael, when they meet again after a long time of separation at the grave of their father Abraham (Gen 25:9)?

Or what are Moses and Miriam saying to each other, when they meet again after the many years that Moses spent with the daughter of the Pharaoh at the palace (scene according to Ex 2:10)?

 

 

 

Sculpting

In Sculpting the body comes into play: scenes, relationships and plots of a story will be portrayed by the participants through the use of their body, but only by those, who wish to do so. Just as with the basic form, here too diverse "right" reactions are possible and not only one conclusive response. Those, who thus embody biblical characters, experience their role often in a very intensive way. Equally, the dynamics of the biblical story become more apparent to those observing the tableau than when encountered on a language level.

          How does Pilate for example wash his hands (Mt 27:24)?

Or how could the sentence according to Acts, "These remained faithful to the teaching of the apostles, to the brotherhood, to the breaking of bread and to the prayers." (Acts 2:42) be staged with different people?

 

 

Bibliolog with Biblical Narrative Figures

During a Bibliolog with Biblical Narrative Figures one or several biblical characters are introduced through a narrative figure. Through this technique the relationship between individual biblical characters is highlighted while its development including changes over the course of the story can be demonstrated. Moreover, the use of such figures makes it possible

(a) to show diverse human gestures (the figures can in various ways kneel, lie, sit, stand, bend, stretch, make themselves small or tall, cover the eyes, assume an entreating posture etc..) and

(b) to express emotions (being enthused, sad, angry, baffles etc.).

How could it look like if the younger son would take time to reflect (Lk 15:17)?

In Mk 10:13b it reads, "The disciples scolded them." You are invited to develop snapshots of this text: how do the children and those who bring them feel after they get snapped at by the disciples? What is their first reaction?

You can get to know the Bibliolog and become a trainer in different courses.